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By Helena Adeloju

A six-unit development at 38-40 Brisbane Street is Berwick’s very own building nightmare.
Brisbane St resident Margaret Edwards wrote to Casey Council recently on behalf of 14 other residents who support her Save Brisbane St campaign.
In the letter, Ms Edwards described herself and other residents as “dismayed” by the condition the site has been in and the “ugly very poorly built units.”
City of Casey manager Statutory Planning and Building Services Duncan Turner confirmed that the development has been the subject of investigation by council.
“There remain a number of outstanding and non-compliant issues with the development that require the owners and developers attention,” he said.
“Council is working with the developer to have the development completed satisfactorily, and will continue to pursue the matter to ensure the owner and developer meet their obligations.”
In her letter, Ms Edwards claims that over the course of the build, work vehicles at the site have caused “dangerous traffic hazards,” tree protection zone requirements have been “abused,” bobcat machinery has been operated out of permitted work hours, neighbouring property has been damaged and “a stand of Tuscan Pines” were removed from the property without permission.
Residents who spoke to the Gazette on Monday 3 March said the site was cleared and landscaped on Sunday 2 March, but there had been builders’ rubble, chairs, plastic bins, bottles and tools littering the site previously.
Ms Edwards said residents were aware that the council had served notices on the builder but the warnings appeared to have been ignored.
“I’m really sad about what has happened at 38-40 Brisbane St,” she said. “I’m hellbent on stopping it from happening anymore.”
Ms Edwards said Brisbane St residents would continue to battle similar development proposals that they didn’t believe reflected “the unique neighbourhood character of this part of Berwick.”
“The major concerns are overdevelopment, loss of privacy, loss of vegetation, increased traffic, increased street parking and loss of value to homes,” she said.
Ms Edwards maintains that she is not opposed to development, but said she cares deeply about how it is carried out.
“My concern is that the council is not encouraging a diversity of dwelling type,” she said.

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